Best wood screws – Reviews and Guide in 2022

Crafted Garage is supported by its readers. This post contains affiliate links, we may earn a commission at no additional costs to you. We hope you love the products we recommend

Best wood screws

Bonding two pieces of wood sounds like an easy task, but it really isn’t. Do you use glue? Nails, what about screws? Then what type of screws? What are the best wood screws? Should they be coated? What length or gauge should you use? What about the material? Stainless steel? Coated or not? Finding the best screw for wood, can seem like a daunting task.

The market has provided a wide range of wood screws for all occasions. This can be overwhelming whether you are a professional or new to the craft. This is why I’ve listed some of the best wood screws on the market, hopefully reducing the number of wood screws you need to look into.

Hopefully, this article will stop any confusion and lead you to the perfect wood screw for your project.

Power Pro Premium Exterior Wood Screws, 9 x 3", 5 lb Bucket of Screws, Exterior Epoxy Coated, Bronze, 417 Pieces Power Pro Premium Exterior Wood Screws, 9 x 3", 5 lb Bucket of Screws, Exterior Epoxy Coated, Bronze, 417 Pieces
  • ENGINEERED FOR THE OUTDOORS: Ideal for decking and any outdoor wood project
  • BEST-IN-CLASS CORROSION PROTECTION: Bronze epozy coating offers superior rust and corrosion protection
  • SELF-STARTING TIP: Offers 20 percent faster engagement into wood; no splitting
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

Best Wood Screws Reviews

Kreg SML-C125 - 500 Zinc Pocket Screws, 1-1/4 Inch #8Coarse Thread, Maxi-Loc Head (500 Count) Kreg SML-C125 - 500 Zinc Pocket Screws, 1-1/4 Inch #8Coarse Thread, Maxi-Loc Head (500 Count)
  • Hole screws prevent overdriving in pocket bottoms
  • Self-tapping auger tips do away with predrilling
  • Large diameter of steel shank creates durable screw
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

Whether you are repairing something, creating a DIY, or even a professional project such as cabinetry, these Kreg zinc screws are great. These are perfect for indoor applications and perfect for use in pocket holes.

These have two types of threads, fine threads and coarse threads, to suit the variety of woods. These come in a length of 1 1/4 inches with dimensions of 3×4.9×4.2 inches. The construction of this square drive screw is composed of zinc and carbon steel.

This is a self-drilling or self-tapping tip, so it drills its own hole. It is a quick and easy driving screw that is designed to reduce the chances of the wood splitting or breaking up. Softwoods or plywoods can handle the coarse threaded screw, which is great as these are often found in pocket hole joinery.

Kreg pocket screws head style is different from most other woodworking screws due to their drive for pocket hole work. Most have a conical shape, but Kreg has a flat head shape, which is perfect for the flat bottom is ideal for pocket holes, so these are often used in pocket hole joinery. Washer head screws do not allow overdriving.

Pros

  • Large bearing surface
  • fantastic holding power
  • No rusting or corrosion.

Cons

  • Can’t drive below the surface
  • Only applicable for indoor use

View on Amazon

Reliable Hardware Company RH-5112BO-A Truss, 50 Count Reliable Hardware Company RH-5112BO-A Truss, 50 Count
  • 8 X 1/2'' Truss Head Wood Screw
  • Black Oxide + Wax
  • Bag of 50 pcs.
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

These reliable black wood screw primarily comes from the United States. These are made from black oxide and wax. This is a truss-headed screw that measures 8×1/2 inches.

The tip of this screw is rather sharp, and the threads and slots are clean and deep. The waxing feature makes this a really easy driving screw. These also drive into stainless steel materials with ease and offer excellent holding power; these are perfect sheet metal screws.

If you want a screw that’s great for repairing your small furniture, These black screws have a fine and smooth finish that looks great on most materials. I’ve used these to fix curtain rods and railings in the past.

These weigh about 2.88 ounces and are known for their sturdiness. If you are working on a small project, then these are sized perfectly. These are smaller in size and come in packs of 50.

Pros

  • Durable
  • Bur-free
  • Small and sturdy

Cons

  • Head is a touch small

View on Amazon

Power Pro Premium Exterior Wood Screws, 9 x 3", 5 lb Bucket of Screws, Exterior Epoxy Coated, Bronze, 417 Pieces Power Pro Premium Exterior Wood Screws, 9 x 3", 5 lb Bucket of Screws, Exterior Epoxy Coated, Bronze, 417 Pieces
  • ENGINEERED FOR THE OUTDOORS: Ideal for decking and any outdoor wood project
  • BEST-IN-CLASS CORROSION PROTECTION: Bronze epozy coating offers superior rust and corrosion protection
  • SELF-STARTING TIP: Offers 20 percent faster engagement into wood; no splitting
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

If you want the most functional screws on the market, then look no further than Hillman. These are well designed for exterior use. If you want hardware that will last a long time and prevent stripping, then Hillman power pro is an excellent choice.

These screws come in a pack of 417 pieces which makes them perfect for working with decking and any outdoor wooden project. These screws are made with a bronze ceramic coating and incorporate a cross-cut thread which makes driving these easy, almost self-drilling.

These screws have been tested with a 1000 hour salt spray test which is a must-have to meet compliance under ASTMB116. These offer quick engagement in a wooden object, which, unlike traditional wood screws, offers a lower change of splitting and a great wood bond.

This screw optimizes the drive torque with its 6-point contact design, which reduces slippage while drilling. It’s also gets specialized countersinking blades that give you that perfect finished hole without damaging the wood surface.

There are very few screw manufacturers who offer the twist shank, which adds reduced friction and prevents slipping of the screw. For me, Hillman screws set themselves apart from their competition because of their quality, and for me, these are undoubtedly the best screws for hardwood available.

The sharp screw point provides quick drilling and is perfect for DIY and commercial decking.

Pros

  • Easy to drill
  • Bore Fast Serrated Thread
  • Offer faster engagement with less splitting
  • Bronze coated screws

Cons

  • None, I love these.

View on Amazon

We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

Rusting can be a huge problem when using hardware in the elements. These screws have been designed with corrosion resistance in mind. This means they resist rusting. They are made with a light zinc plating that sits on top of hardened steel screws, making these remarkably rust-resistant wood screws.

This comes in at a length of 1/2 inches in length and has a black phosphate finish. This steel wood screw has a nice flat head style. These work well with a saddle fastener and work well with the hardest of woods, thanks to their sharp point.

These work well on rough lumber.

Pros

  • Prevents stripping
  • Very Durable
  • Perfect for DIY
  • Designed to prevent rust

Cons

  • Quite pricey, so not easy on your wallet.
  • Not great for those heavier applications

View on Amazon

WoodPro Fasteners AP9X212-1 #9 by 2-1/2-Inch All Purpose Wood Construction Screws, T25, 1LB Net Weight,Gold WoodPro Fasteners AP9X212-1 #9 by 2-1/2-Inch All Purpose Wood Construction Screws, T25, 1LB Net Weight,Gold
  • #9 x 2-1/2", Includes One 25mm T-25 Star Bit
  • T-25 Star Drive, Torx(tm) Compatible
  • Sharp Type-17 Point
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

If you are looking for some wood screws that don’t need any pre-drilling or require a pilot hole, that can go through wood smoothly. Then This brand of wood screws are exactly what you want.

This is an all-purpose wood screw and can be used on both interior and exterior applications. It’s no surprise that these are known as some of the best wood screws for woodworking. These are coated with a golden Electro-polyseal coating.

An interesting feature of these woodpro wood screws is that they have nibs under the head, which helps give clean finishes on a wide range of materials. These are incredibly durable in all kinds of weather thanks to their coating, a coating that doesn’t wear off quickly in any climate conditions.

This is a star drive screw that prevents stripping. Also, the PPG coating is proven and checked by testing on treated lumber. You know you are getting quality and the product that’s been tested for what it’s used for.

Pros

  • Self-drilling wood screws
  • Can be driven easily
  • Strong holding power

Cons

  • Star heads are a bit weak

View on Amazon

We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

If you are looking for a flat head screw that’s been designed specifically for cabinetry work, then this GRK product is ideal for making cabinets. This is why these are named as a cabinet handypak.

These have a patented coating for installing and constructing cabinets. These feature a diameter of 8 gauges which is ~4mm. These weigh 12.8 ounces and have a total dimension of 8x4x2 inches. Unlike other screws, these are much thinner. Made specifically to prevent splitting any material.

The thread design of this product is W-cut self-tapping. This ensures a secure construction and loads of strength. The washer head ensures a flush finish. Plus, I love the dark brass finish.

These have a climate coating, so they won’t stain regardless of the weather condition. This coating prevents corrosion and rust and means they can be used on highly corrosive treated woods.

Pros

  • Comes with a T-15 bit
  • Sharp zip tip
  • Effortless driving

Cons

  • Does not support large scale cabinetry work

View on Amazon

We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

Guarddog wood screws are multi-purpose screws, which are excellent for exterior woodworks. These have been tested thoroughly in treated lumber such as cedar, redwood, and even pressure-treated ACQ.

These come in packs that weigh 1.1 pounds with dimensions of 4.5x3x2 inches. These wood screws are fantastic as wood deck screws as they feature anti-corrosion and anti-rusting coatings.

These are fully threaded, and those threads are aggressive. These wood screws ensure robust gripping power regardless of the materials they are bonding.

When you purchase these wood screws, they include a Pozisquare drive bit in each box. This means you can use a square of Phillips bit depending on your mood.

These wood screws don’t require any pre-drilling and are easily driven into wood. These won’t disappoint in the quality of their performance. These are highly durable, reliable, and work well for outdoor and indoor use.

Pros

  • Great on softwoods
  • Coating design prevents stripping

Cons

  • Bends easily

View on Amazon

These wood screws are stainless steel and coated in xylan black coating. I love a durable quality stainless steel screw. These are perfect for exterior or interior use, thanks to the stainless steel.

These work well in wood and composite materials, and the manufacturer guarantees 100% quality served. These offer excellent secure gripping power.

The Phillips drive of these wood screws offers deep cuts which hold firm, and stainless steel nature means no head stripping.

I recommend pre-drilling if you want a tighter grip when using these. They have fine threads, so they work well when used in MDF and other particle boards.

These come in a wide range of sizes, so you can find the right size for the task you have at hand, though these aren’t a flat head screw.

Pros

  • It can be used in a saltwater environment

Cons

  • Expensive
  • No flat head version

View on Amazon

Grip-Rite PTN3S1 3-Inch 8 Coarse Thread Exterior Screw with Bugle Head, 1 Pound Grip-Rite PTN3S1 3-Inch 8 Coarse Thread Exterior Screw with Bugle Head, 1 Pound
  • 3-inch #8 bugle head #2 phillips drive
  • PG+10 grey coarse thread sharp point
  • Sturdy cardboard box with view window and description label
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

Grip-Rite offers extraordinary construction and a wide functional range of wood screws for outdoor use.

You don’t need to pre-drill for these wood screws and will easily drive into wood without any real pressure being applied. These are multi-purpose screws, making these usable for a wide variety of applications. These are bugle head, so they work very well with plywood and drywall applications.

The grey coarse threads allow for easy drilling and long-lasting grip strength. These are designed to comply with ASTM and UBS specifications which makes these the best choice for most types of woodwork.

These offer protection against rust and corrosion when used in decking and fences, so no unsightly stains. This is a waterproof screw and can be used in outdoor frames such as cabinets and wooded beds, and doorframes.

Pros

  • Easily driven screws
  • Strong holding power
  • Durable and sturdy construction
  • Rust and Corrosion-free

Cons

  • Not cheap

View on Amazon

#8 Deck Screws, Select Length in Listing, 18-8 Stainless Steel, Square Drive, Type 17 Wood Cutting Point, Quantity 100 (#8 x 1-1/4") #8 Deck Screws, Select Length in Listing, 18-8 Stainless Steel, Square Drive, Type 17 Wood Cutting Point, Quantity 100 (#8 x 1-1/4")
  • Screw Size #8 (0.164") - Straight Pilot Drill size for Soft Wood 7/64 . Straight Pilot Drill size for Hard Wood 1/8
  • Screw length measured from top of flat to tip of screw 1-1/4" (1.25") - Screw head Diameter 0.340"
  • #2 Robertson Drive ( Square )
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

Finally, a specialized deck screw is on the list. These come in at 3x1x6 inches in dimensions. From top to bottom, this wood screw measures 1″ in length and 0.340 in diameter.

These are made with 18-8 stainless steel and are designed to be rust-free hardware perfect for outdoor applications. You can also get these as 2 1/2 inch deck screws

These use a Square drive/Robertson drive/Scrulox drive head. Basically, it has a square socket that prevents slippage when being driven.

These work really well for decking and have no issues when working with slim planks. These can be countersunk easily without damaging the surface of the material. These also offer self-drilling, self-laying screws with a non-corrosive coating.

These deck screws consist of a shank and come in a wide range of lengths and widths to meet your needs. There’s no need for pilot holes which is great as that saves you time.

Pros

  • Deep thread
  • Unbreakable screws
  • Inexpensive

Cons

  • Holding power isn’t the best

View on Amazon

What to look for when buying woodworking screws

It’s doubtful that this is the first time you’ve worked with wood screws, but that doesn’t mean you’ll know the difference between good quality and bad quality screws.

No doubt you’ve grabbed whatever you can get your hands on at the hardware store and found that the heads have stripped or they’ve just not done their one job very well.

So what should you look for in a wood screw?

Material

When you are looking to buy wood screws, one of the considerations is the type of material used to manufacture the wood screw.

You’ll find that most traditional wood screws are usually stainless steel screws that have been coated with a zinc coating. These are considered to be high quality and much more durable than other forms of steel screws. Stainless screws are one of the strongest screws available on the market. These are perfect for outdoor woodworking projects as they offer corrosion resistance. Stainless steel doesn’t rust, so you don’t end up with the unsightly orange staining from a rusted screw. Brass screws also offer excellent outdoor resistance.

Size of the screws

You need to consider the length and thickness of the wood screw when it comes to finishing and creating those strong wooden joints. You want a wood screw that’s long and thick enough to offer the right amount of support. While not being too big that you end up permanently damaging your project.

I do suggest creating a small pilot hole before you drive the wood screw in; this prevents the wood from splitting.

Screw Head

One of the most important factors when purchasing a screw for woodworking is the drive type and the screw head shape; there are many types of screws:

  • Phillips Screws

The most common drive types that you’ll find are Phillips types of screws; these have the Phillips head screws pattern, which is a cross. These have been on the market since the beginning of the 20th century. This style of head has been commonplace in the market since then. These were introduced as an upgrade over the slotted screws, which they really are.

  • Square Drive

Drive and square drive-headed screws, which are of a square nature. Square drive were introduced in the market as an upgrade over the Phillips screws tip and flathead screw. Another name for these is the Robertson screw. These are very common in Canada.

The square shape excellently eradicates the cam-out and lessons the slipping of the driver. Something the pocket screw also offers.

  • Bugle head

Bugle head screws are the most popular types of screws used to construct plywood walls. These drive in quickly and have heads that are designed to automatically sink flush in all but the hardest of woods, such as rosewood or ebony. You’ll find bugle head screws to have good holding power. This is why bugle head screws are perfect for plywood walls.

  • Trim head screws

Trim head screws are very similar to bugle head. Trim head screws are easy to sink flush into the surface. I love trim head screws when working on projects such as door jams.

  • Flathead Screw / slotted screws

There are also flat head screws which are a straight slot on top. These I’m not a big fan of. Your screwdriver will often skip out of the screw head and potentially damage your project. Though for fine threads and fine furniture, flat head screws are commonplace. These are also known as a slotted screw.

  • Torx Drive or Star Drive Screw

These have the popular star shape on top. Because of its shape, it has become rather popular. This unique shape prevents drive slip out. You also don’t face any cam-out. These types of screws are usually made to a premium quality and come with a dedicated bit. Torx are designed to handle large amounts of torque; as such, they don’t break when tightened tightly.

  • Pan head

Pan head screws are excellent for attaching acrylic to wood. You won’t often see these in woodworking because they sit on top of the wood. These cannot be driven below the surface and sit quite proud.

This is why pan head screws are used to attach things to wood.

Thread types

There are many types of threaded screws. Each offers a different use and is made differently.

You’ll find fine coarse thread drywall screws, fine coarse threaded screws, fine threaded screws. These are designed to be suitable for use as drywall screws and plywood.

Coarse threaded screws are easy to drill and take a lot less time to remove, while fine threaded screws take longer to fit and benefit from pre-tapped holes.

You’ll also find different types of threaded screws such as serrated threads, twin thread, and dual thread. These types of screw threads help in reducing the splitting of the wood and also provide quick fastening. These are coarse threads and aren’t ideal for fine woodworking.

Shank

The screw shank is very important when buying woodworking screws. This covers the threads, varies in size and thickness, and is measured in numbers. The higher the thickness of the shank, the better it will perform against stresses. The shank is the part where the threads connect. The most common sizes of shanks are 6,8, and 10. Some have threads from the start to the pointed tip, while others have a portion of the screw having a smooth shank.

Screw tip or point

The pointed tip of the wood screw is actually a really useful feature for your woodworking jobs. This is what helps with the accuracy of your drilling. You’ll find versions that are designed as a self-drilling tip. These I love as you don’t need to apply much strength to drive these into thick hardwood. If you need to cut wood as you would with a drill, then look for a sharp point which is a split point tip screw. These have a sharp point but also cut as they are driven in.

The type-17 Auger point is something you’ll see these days, they deliver excellent performance, and its sharp threads are as sharp as a needle.

Painted Screws, Screw paints, or coatings

You’ll find many different types of painted screws and coated screws. These coatings help with the corrosion resistance provided by the screw head. It keeps the screws rust-free. It can also help with the presentation of the end product and increase the lifespan of the wood screws when drilled into wood.

These screw coatings preserve the screws against moisture and rust. Protecting them from the elements and tough weather conditions. It prevents stains to your project and is also resistant to heat.

So choose the type of coating that suits your needs. For example, a bright zinc coating has been found on steel screws for years, as it lessens friction and prevents corrosion, making them perfect for outdoor projects, though I prefer the golden yellow zinc coating for outdoors.

Some other well-known coating methods are HCR which offers a dual barrier coating system, Blue-kote, Epoxy coat, and weather Maxx. There are also brass screws.

Finding the best screws and the best wood screws for your needs is easy enough when you factor the above into your decisions.

Different Types Of Woodworking Screws

types of wood screws

You’ll often find glue and nails used to fasten wood together. But it’s not uncommon to find fine wood screws in place of nails. Glue is still used to provide that chemical bond.

Screws can be the perfect choice, but you need to select the best screws for wood that will meet your requirements.

These screws are the most common wood screws used for woodworking.

1. Standard wood screw

The standard wood screw is the most common wood screws that you’ll find. These aren’t the strongest screws, but they are perfect for general purposes.

These typically range from 3 to 4 inches in length; they come in varying gauges and sizes.

This type of wood screws is widely available and is usually rather cheap when compared to wood screws used for more specialized purposes.

They’ll usually have a semi-threaded shank and a tapered head, which is usually a Phillips screw head. You’ll usually find these used as non-structural screws. They are often used as cheap deck screws.

2. Deck Screws

Deck screws are another type of wood screw that is also very cheap, these don’t tend to hit hard on your pocket, but you tend to need a fair number of them.

These are very similar to your common wood screw but come with extra benefits, such as being made from hard iron and coated in a corrosion-resistant coating or they are made from stainless steel or copper. For example the Grip Rite Prime Guard Deck Screws can in a varierty of sizes such as 1 5/8 screws and are made with an alloy steel, which is resistant to corrosion.

Due to how a deck screw is used outside, the head is usually quite large so that it can bear more load.

These are used widely in outdoor projects due to their resistance to the weather.

3. Pocket Screws

Joining two pieces of wood together at the end using screws always brings the fear of splitting or breaking the workpiece when using multipurpose screws

A pocket screw is a self-drilling screw that features a wide head and a flat shoulder which prevents any digging into the pre-drill pilot holes. If you were to use a multipurpose screw head with pocket hole joinery, they can drive too deep and split the wood.

Because these pilot holes are close to the edge of the board, you want to use the right screw for the job to prevent your workpiece from splitting.

Pocket screws have self-piercing points and large heads.

4. Lag Screws

Lag screws are types of screws that have a hex washer head. These are designed for heavy-duty purposes.

Lag screws can also be named lag bolts because of their ability to handle higher bearing loads. These screws are used with a washer to increase their tension area and to spread the pressure along the surface.

These screws are typically tightened with wrenches as these screws require much more torque, but the end results in a very strong wood fastening.

5. Structural screws

The name might give away its purpose. These screws are used heavily where screw failure can have devasting results.

These screws are similar to normal screws but will vary based on their application. You’ll often find these used in building frames; structural screws are much more durable.

6. Drywall screws

Drywall screws don’t come to mind when you think of woodworking screws, but when you think of a wood jig or a sawhorse, drywall screws can play a vital role in fastening.

These are cheap and are used widely in wooden or even metal surfaces when you need to fasten panels.

7. Machine Screws

You won’t find machine screws common when woodworking, machine screws are very special purpose. The only time I’ve used these is when I need to have a screw and couple, typically in makeshift heavy-duty workbenches.

8. Stainless steel screws

Your regular steel screws are some of the most reliable and weather-resistance screws. Stainless steel screws have their own corrosion-resistant coating and can be used in a huge amount of conditions that are highly exposed to water and wet atmospheres.

These are strong wood screws and can be found in boat construction and seaside structures.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Which screw should you use for woodworking?

This is a tough question, as it really depends on what you are doing. What it needs to look like, and whether or not you want your customer to see them. So knowing the material and the purpose just isn’t enough.

You need to take into consideration the following:

Length And Gauge: How thick is the wood, how long is it? These are important when working out what length and gauge of screw to use; you don’t want to use something that’s too long for the job at hand.

Screw Drive: I like to be able to drive a screw in by hand, but some screws are designed as drill screws and will be difficult to drive by hand. So choosing the screw head is important. Plus, if it’s furniture, the exterior screws will typically be a flathead screw. Though I love a hex or Phillips head myself for multipurpose screws.

Head Type: Screws come in two types of heads. Flat/Shrank head or pan/round head.

A flathead screw is ideal when more support is required; pan or round head screws are ideal for fastening.

Self-Drilling: I love this type for general purpose work as they save time and effort when fastening. Self-tapping screws are a real-time saver.

Material: The material you are using is important, some screws do better in softwoods, and others need to be incredibly tough to handle woods such as ebony, which is incredibly hard. Take into consideration that The application and usage are highly dependent on the material. Also, consider the elements that the screw will live in.

2. Is it possible to use fine thread drywall screws for wood?

Absolutely, you can use drywall screws to dry into wood studs. But I wouldn’t suggest using a coarse thread drywall screw if the stud is a steel stud.

3. Fine or coarse thread, which one is stronger?

This may surprise you, but a fine thread is stronger as it’s not prone to become loose due to the smaller thread include and torque.

4. What is a pilot hole?

A pilot hole is when you drill (or has been drilled) a hole smaller than the diameter of the thread. This is commonly used in softwood to prevent splitting.

5. Is drilling a hole necessary before installing the screw?

No, you don’t need to do this, but it does help prevent splitting.

6. What’s a better screw for plywood or softwood

For plywood, I suggest any general-purpose screw, but a bugle head works best. For softwood, any general purpose screw will do.

Wrap Up

Hopefully, I’ve managed to provide you with all the information you could ever want to know about wood screws. I’ve done my best to narrow the list down to only the best wood screws through a lot of research, research that you don’t have to do.

If you have any questions, please reach out.